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Breaking your femur in a car crash can be a life-threatening event. Here’s what you need to know if you have suffered a femur break: You may be aware that North Carolina follows the rule of pure contributory negligence, which means you won’t recover damages in a personal injury claim unless the defendant was 100% at fault for the crash. Assuming that your case holds up, you will want to be familiar with the nature of the injuries you sustained.

Where the femur can be fractured

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons states that femur fractures are more often caused by auto accidents than by any other incident. The femur is the strongest bone in the body, so usually only a high-impact crash will break it. There are partial breaks and complete breaks. The elderly tend to partially break the femoral neck in a fall: an injury sometimes known as a hip fracture.

Crash victims often break the femur along the shaft or midsection that runs from the femoral head and neck down to the distal end, which connects to the knee joint. The bone may even splinter after being crushed.

Femur fracture-related dangers

Pedestrians and motorcyclists tend to suffer femur fractures more than vehicle occupants due to the lack of protection around them. Along with the fracture, victims may tear muscles and ligaments, lose an alarming amount of blood and develop blood clots.

Treatment will likely require more than just a cast. If the femur is displaced, doctors will need to insert a metal rod into it. Metal wires and screws may be necessary to bring the broken pieces together. Doctors may give antibiotics, too, since there’s the risk for infection whenever the bone protrudes.

Filing your claim with legal assistance

A personal injury case can be hard to build up with evidence, and negotiations for a settlement can be time-consuming as the other side keeps trying to force you into a low-ball settlement. You may want a lawyer and his or her network of crash investigators help you. The lawyer may, then, represent you at the negotiation table, litigating if all else fails.